Why Do Students Have So Much Debt?
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Why Do Students Have So Much Debt?


At the University of Pennsylvania, where I
went as an undergrad, the average tuition and fees in the 2018-19 school year for a
private four-year college are over $50,000. And at public four-year university, like U.
of Michigan in Ann Arbor, the cost for out-of-state students is around $49,000 and in state students
over $15,000. Of course, these numbers do not include room,
board, or other expenses, such as books, transportation, and the personal technology that is increasingly
required to keep up with all of the work. When you throw in all of these, the final
numbers can be truly staggering. So how, on earth, do American students pay
for this? As most of you know (all-to-well!), most rely
on scholarships, grants, and loans to cover their costs. Scholarships do not need to be repaid; grants,
sometimes do; and student loans, like death and taxes always come back to bite you because
they always need to be repaid. According to Forbes Magazine, student loan
debt is the second highest consumer debt category next to mortgage debt. 44.2 million borrowers owe $1.52 trillion! The numbers are mind-boggling! But how did our society get here? The answer is two-fold: the US government
and private lending companies have made accruing student loan debt very easy –and- the cost
of American higher education has risen enormously (a situation related to many factors, not
the least of which is the availability of student loans!). Today, I will break down the history of student
loan debt and explore why such debt has come into being and become so commonplace for so
many of us. In their book on student loan debt, sociologist
Joel Best and quantitative researcher Eric Best, a father-son duo, explain the evolution
of student loans as a series of snowballing “messes.” The first “mess” they identify began as
a result of WWII, as the government wanted to ensure that more Americans had access to
higher ed. (and also to prevent them overloading a labor market that might not have room for
them). In 1944, the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act
(commonly known to us as the GI Bill) offered benefits for veterans, including loans to
help purchase homes, farms and businesses. It also sent payment directly to schools up
until 1952 to cover tuition and fees; book costs; and room and board and it gave veterans
a living allowance. 7.8 million veterans received some educational
benefits from this program. Sadly, a third of the money in the educational
part of the GI Bill was wasted on fictional institutions, job-training scams, and real
schools that inflated their fees. Clearly, more oversight was needed. But instead of turning their eyes to the bottom
line, the US government turned their eyes (and educational ambitions) to the stars. After the Soviets launched Sputnik (and threatened
to dominate the space-race), the federal government passed the National Defense Education Act
of 1958. This was the first large-scale federal student
loan program for higher education in the US. Its rationale was lofty—to cultivate an
army of super-nerds who could deploy their mad science, tech, and language skills to
defend the nation during the Cold War. The Act states: The Congress hereby finds and declares that
the security of the Nation requires the fullest development of the mental resources and technical
skills of its young men and women. The present emergency demands that additional
and more adequate educational opportunities be made available. The defense of this Nation depends upon the
mastery of modern techniques developed from complex scientific principles. It depends as well upon the discovery and
development of new principles, new techniques and new knowledge. So… here’s how the first student loans
distributed under this program worked: the federal government made money available to
colleges. Colleges would then match at least one dollar
for every nine that the government provided. Students could then borrow this money as a
loan to cover costs. It seemed like a good fix. In 1965, the Higher Education Act added scholarships
and work-study programs into the mix. That same year, the National Vocational Student
Loan Insurance Act established federally guaranteed loans for vocational training. More students than ever had access to loans,
which meant that more people had access to higher ed. But here’s the rub: The cost of higher education
was not only rising, but it was also outstripping the rate of inflation or the percent that
prices change from one year to the next. Here’s a crude example of how inflation
is supposed to work: Imagine that tuition and fees for a given school year are $30,000
and the cost of grocery trip is about $100. If inflation were say 2%, we might expect
the same groceries to cost about $102 during the next year. We would therefore expect tuition and fees
to reach $30,600 if they rose at the same rate. However in reality, tuition and fees in the
US were rising at a much higher speed than inflation of other products. But why was this happening? In part, it was due to colleges were making
extravagant changes to attract and keep top students because they were more statistically
likely to land high-paying jobs and repay their debts on time. This involved updates to infrastructure, like
dorms, classrooms, eating facilities, and fitness centers in order to increase their
posh appearances and justify sky-rocketing costs. It was also because students were being treated
more like customers and less like students and they were willing to pay these higher
fees in order to get the perks. In fact, it became so easy for low-and mid-
income students to finance college with loans, that many stopped paying attention to the
cost of higher ed. The availability of student loans meant that
colleges could raise prices without really affecting enrollments. As a larger number of people took out loans,
there was a greater chance that more individuals would default on those loans. Add to this one more wrinkle: vocational schools
were generally for-profit, so they were more focused on enrollment numbers to increase
their access to government money. As some institutions lowered admission standards
to fill seats and line pockets, they filled their classes with people who were more likely
to dropout of school, causing a spike in student loan defaults. One response to these defaults was for the
federal government to offer more grants (as opposed to loans) to students from low-income
families. In 1972, Senator Claiborne Pell created the
Basic Educational Opportunity Grant program (later to be renamed Pell Grants). As historian Andrew Delbanco reports, in 1976
the maximum federal Pell grant covered nearly 90 percent of attending a four-year public
institution. By 2004, these grants would cover less than
25 percent, causing students from this demographic to supplement their grants with even more
loans. Another federal response to the spike in defaults
was creating the Student Loan Marketing Association (also known as Sallie Mae), an entity mandated
to manage student loans. So, here’s how Sallie Mae worked: A bank
lends a student money. The bank sells this loan to Sallie Mae, enabling
that bank to re-lend the money to a new customer. Sallie Mae issues a government-guaranteed
debt on the loan, which makes the loan a relatively-safe long-term investment. Sallie-Mae bundles these loans and sells them
to investors. Though Sallie Mae has since been privatized
and basically none of what I told you still holds, it was a convenient arrangement, with
an unexpected side-effect on the number of individuals that would leave school in debt. If this is the first “mess” that the Bests
identify related to student loans, the second has to do with how the government handled
those who defaulted on their loans. In 1976, an amendment to the Higher Education
Act made it illegal to declare bankruptcy within the first 5 years of one’s repayment
period. (In 1990, this ban was extended to 7 years). Later amendments made borrowers ineligible
to discharge their student loans through bankruptcy unless they could demonstrate undue hardship. Other policies made it easier to repay one’s
debt by delaying the start of payments or by reducing the size of installments–options
that would ultimately cost the borrower more in interest payments. And today, there are two main categories of
student loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. Subsidized loans are for those who can demonstrate
financial need. For years, the Federal Perkins Loan Program
provided funds for college or career school for students with financial need. The Perkins program ended on September 30,
2017. Today, students who demonstrate financial
need can apply for Subsidized Stafford loans, which are available regardless of one’s
credit score (because, let’s face it, most 18 year olds don’t exactly have credit scores
yet!). With these loans, the government pays any
interest that accrues on the loan while the student is still in school. Unsubsidized loans are for students who need
help paying for higher education, but have a smaller financial need. With an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, students
are responsible for paying back the interest that accrues while they are in school, but
they don’t have to make payments until they leave school. Parents can also take out loans to pay for
the education of their children called PLUS loans. PLUS loans are made by private lenders or
can be direct loans from the federal government (if the borrower proves financial need). These require a review of credit history,
are not subsidized or guaranteed, and repayment begins immediately. PLUS loans are also available to graduate
or professional students. Finally, there are a wide variety of direct
loans available, which can be taken from banks or other lending institutions. Many students find it annoying to keep track
of so many different kinds of loan payments when they graduate and they consolidate, or
combine, their loans with one agency for a fee. This makes it easier to track payments. It also allows individuals to lower their
monthly payments by extending their repayment period. In February 2019, the Federal Reserve Bank
of New York’s Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit reported that outstanding
student loan debt was at $1.46 trillion. And it had increased, if you can believe it,
$20 billion since the third quarter of 2018. It also reported that 9.08% of student loans
were 90 days or more delinquent. This debt can lead some into another “mess”….as
the Bests describe it… financial paralysis for the individual. So the historical Catch 22 that is student
loan debt in the US plays out in a couple of ways. Because the government and private banking
institutions created student loans in order to increase school enrollment and spread access
to education. But the ballooning costs of university and
vocational training, plus the increased complexity of loan initiatives means that more students
are defaulting on loans, dropping out, and leaving school in debt. So a solution that was initially meant to
make education more accessible and affordable has created an environment where exactly the
opposite is true for many looking to get higher degrees. But turning students into customers has also
created expected push back from frustrated debtors. Take for example the Occupy Student Debt Campaign,
which was launched in 2011 as a student debt abolition movement. And it’s based on four basic principles: 1. Free public education, through federal coverage
of tuition fees. 2. Zero-interest student loans, so that no one
can profit from debt. 3. Fiscal transparency at all universities, public
as well as private, 4. The elimination of current student debt, through
a single act of relief.

About James Carlton

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100 thoughts on “Why Do Students Have So Much Debt?

  1. Hello and Hi Everyone! Because this is a new episode/upload I'll be signed on here for the next hour answering the comments and questions that roll in. So drop them below and let's talk about student loan debt (or anything else). Let's go!
    -Danielle

  2. Ironic ending to the video talking about student debt then bringing up a woman with a PhD in monsters 😂

  3. So with unlimited government money, we see multi-million salaries for administrators, academically worthless majors, and students with no skills working jobs that used to be performed by high school students after school or by high school dropouts.

  4. Bottom line: if you didn’t score in the 85th percentile or higher on your SAT or ACT then you probably shouldn’t go to college.

  5. Veteran here, I used my GI BIll and Navy College Fund to pay for college. That was 20 years ago and I can easily recommend military service to anyone struggling with the decision to take on incomprehensibly expensive student debt for college. My first house purchase cost me $105K and it blows my mind to see some recent college graduates with more than that in student loan debt!

  6. She ends the show talking about someone who has a PhD in “monsters” yet is somehow surprised by the so-called student debt crisis

  7. When I was in college, the public university I attended decided to raise tuition by a fairly decent percentage to pay for a shiny new fitness center. Last time I checked, you go to a university to get a degree in a hopefully marketable major. You don't go in order to work out on a treadmill or lift weights. The cost of that tuition increase far exceeded the cost of joining a private gym. It's crazy, and we the students had no choice in the matter.

  8. Anyone with a brain would figure out their money situation and go with the best financial path, for me it was community college. If you go OOS and pile up 100k+ debt that’s your fault🤷‍♂️ and I would not support using taxes to pay off your debt. I could of happily gone to my oos school pick and just had taxpayers pay it off

  9. Wrong. If your parents had you while poor(obviously no money planned for your career) then take some responsibility and pay off your own damn depts. Whining about it isn’t going to make it go away. Have some dignity, DONT HAVE ANY KIDS IF YOU ARE POOR, and stop expecting taxpayers to bail your ass out!

  10. Everybody saying don't go to college but if you have no skills or no idea what you want to do in life then you kinda should. It doesn't have to be a university, you could go to a trade school or community college full-time or part-time and work a job.

  11. Went to community college. Paid for it working 2 jobs while in school full time. Them transferred to a 4 yrs and finished up the remaining two years. Debt free !!!!! Dont chose a degree where you feel you have to get a loan AMD you're unable to pay back. If you get a high interest loan. Its YOUR fault. Stop bitching

  12. I just graduated from my degree in Business Administration and I am at 50k student loan due to take out massive investments to finance my education. I do not regret taking out the student loan, but I wanted to get a college degree get out of poverty. I wanted to continue with my MBA in Agribusiness ( Agriculture business ).

  13. 4. Elimination of all student debt at one time.

    That's the LEAST, THE VERY LEAST they should have done for all students in debt by now!

  14. i like this fam. i got out of school before all this nonsense started happening. my student loans were 24k after a master's degree (2004) in engineering and the interest rate was around 2%. soon after, i started hearing other folks having higher int rates and higher balances. i had no idea it was this deep. now im concerned for my kids ability to go to college.

  15. It’s not a government made problem the blame goes directly in the colleges and universities who have raised tuition twice as fast as the rise of health care. Harvard charges $50,000 per year tuition and yet the have a 45 billion dollar endowment.

  16. $15000 a year are easily doable as long as you do it intelligently. For instance the community college attached to the public school listed here cost less then $6000 a year. So a 4 year degree could cost $42,000 (2 years in the community college and 2 years at the state school) 42,000 is alot, but if you have a part time job from 16 to 18 ( 20hrs × 10 (or what your min wage is) which give you about $17,600. With that you would have your first two years paid for. If you live at home, go to school full time (three times a week can be full time) then you could earn another $17,600 and the rest could be made up as you go. No loans, and that assumes you dont get any grants. So no debt and you have earned your degree. Or, you could get pipefitter/welder/electrician/plumber certificates and make between $60-70,000 a year and it only costs you $12,000 and you can earn that with a part time job. It's not east but it doesnt need to be as hard as we make it.

  17. Really a long winded and not even very informative video. Basically here's the gist.

    First Universities are for profit and foiled every attempt by the government to pay for education by raising their admission rates to match however much the government was willing to pay.

    Second, the government gave up on trying to solve this problem and put Sallie May in charge of it, but Sallie May also went for profit and worked with the universities to deal completely unethical, undefaultable loans to people that were utterly incapable of dealing with them in a scheme to milk their wages the rest of their lives for profit.

    So basically higher education is enslaving you for life in exchange for your education and the banks and university are lining their pockets with the spoils of your future. And we are feeling the effects everywhere. Every other market in the damn country (except for cars, because Americans just LOVE them some depreciating assets) is failing because the banks own everyone's wages.

  18. Greed. The answer is greed.

    University in Europe is free. Masters programs in English across Europe are also free.

    People in Europe laugh at Americans for allowing their system to be as corrupt as it is. Theres no reason for your health care to be expensive, theres no reason it costs $23,000 to have a baby in America and theres no reason for your university to cost anything more than $500 a year. Neither should you be outfitted with a lifetime debt at the age of 18.

    The cycle will however continue, and for the banks and loan offices, thats the best part.

  19. Go in state, duel enroll in high school, pay cash and work. It's really not too much. We need to get rid of student loans all together. Should be giving insured loans by the people to kids with 0 credit history. Once the loans are gone the laws of economics will lower the price. Getting out of school debt free is key, this way you can put 200-400 a month in your Roth 401k at your first job and be a multi millionaire at retirement.

  20. I only borrowed 15k student loan by going to state school in computer engineering then got a job as a software engineer getting paid 130k right out of college. Paid off my loan immediately. Now getting paid 190k 3 yrs later. Make right decision ppl. Life without a loan feels so good.

  21. Students have debt because loans are guaranteed by the federal government. Lenders took their profits and pass it on to the students. As with anything, when the government injects cash into an institution it creates massive constant inflation.

  22. I live in Canada so $9000 a year covers tuition and books and stuff but that's still unacceptable in my opinion I think education should be free.

  23. I promised myself no more debt. No house no car no degree is worth it. Community college. Used car. Rent.

  24. You moronic liberals continue trying to blame "private institutions" and "privatization" for what is clearly a "government based inflation" problem. You can't get these sky high prices without printing money and throwing it to people who cannot pay it back as a sort of "right". There is no "right" to student debt, government needs to butt out. Period. It is a simple fix, and a simple cause and effect relationship.

  25. At this point it's basically impossible to have a BS degree and make enough to live if you have student loans which means you have to go back to school and get more debt. It all feels like a scam to keep poor people poor of in my opinion

  26. The bottom line is this, you signed for the loan and pay back the loan. Crazy thing called being an adult is and what should have thought prior to getting a loan. So default on the loan so the tax payer gets stuck with the bill? If only life was that easy.

  27. This is why I have given not even one penny to my university's fundraisers. I built 10 buildings in the time I was there (as did my colleagues), so they will get not one penny more.

  28. This is a PROBLEM that has been ON GOING in this SOCIETY for QUITE some TIME but to CONTROL it is the MAIN for without the BEST EDUCATION available to OUR CHILDREN AMERICA which EVER ONE who ADMIT to knows we have FALLEN BEHIND in Some FIELDS in the WORLD , and most will not LIE about . There are FIELDS in which NATION was and STILL is the WORLD'S LEADER. EDUCATION of OUR CHILDREN is the ONLY we REMAIN COMPETITIVE in the WORLD for OTHER NATION'S are not STANDING STILL they are PROGRESSING the same we are . At ONE TIME MORE YEAR'S then most REMEMBER AMERICA was the WORLD LEADER in COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY and TELECOMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY , CHINA SURPASSED AMERICA in this FIELDS YEAR'S AGO , AMERICA is STILL SECOND but RUSSIA SUPRISELY is SECOND and MOST that know these FIELDS EVENUALLY they will SURPASS AMERICA , JAPAN who was SECOND there were SURPASSED by RUSSIA YEAR'S AGO. The MAIN THING is the EXSPENCE of a COLLEGE EDUCATION it's become MORE out REACH of STUDENTS in this SOCIETY. Even with the PELL GRANT PROGRAMS in PLACE they are LOANS which MUST be PAYED BACK leaving STUDENTS SADDLED with MORE DEBT they do not LIKE even THINK ABOUT TRYING PAYBACK , SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS HELP . EVEN some it's not a EASY JOB. If some way is not FOUND though to GET THE BEST and BRIGHTS of this NATION the EDUCATION they need , this NATION Will CONTINUE FALL FURTHER BEHIND in the WORLD . There are other PROBLEMS in this NATION and SOCIETY which COMPOUND this PROBLEM , the RESERECTUTION or RACE and CHAVISUM , ANTI SEMITISM and a MULTITUDE of ISSUE'S which has IMPACTED the SOCIETY to POINT they are CAUSING PROBLEMS which should be CONSIDERED PETTY as PROBLEM when it come to the WELL BEING of all in the SOCIETY.

  29. People are not being intellectually honest with themselves… People have a ton of loan debt because families are willing to send their kids to college without any regard for the financial repercussions. Who the hell selects a college educational path in liberal arts programs when you know well and good your best financial prospects are working in the coffee service industry? Why go to an overpriced private school when you know that a public state college serves the same purpose at a fraction of the cost? Seriously, there are no economic or commercial needs for useless college degrees like ethic studies, art history, or safe space studies. People should be studying subjects like engineering, math, science, business, medical professions, etc. Once these college students realize that spending $200k on useless 4-year degrees was a massive mistake, then they started demanding loan forgiveness because they were "unfairly saddled" with student debt…. Which they voluntarily took on…

  30. Student loan interest rates should be capped, within ranges. For less than $20k debt, maybe it should be capped at 2 or 3%.

  31. I love this channel! Im not sure if there is enough information on this and would like to know more about why the school day end two hours before the workday?

  32. I can't believe that so many people have student loan debt, $44 million! Why!!!! There are so many ways that students can pay for education. There are so many myths about how to get a college education. Why does every American think they NEED a degree from and expensive US university. College is much cheaper outside the US. Look at Europe's college and universities! They are much cheaper! If you are looking to go to a college just because of it's name, football team, fitness facilities, or prestige you get what you pay for and I don't feel sorry for you.

  33. Student loan is threaten to lock me up. I guess student loan is the new crime. It's not a crime for them to train me for a job that didn't exist but it is a crime if I don't make payments.

  34. I think a lot of students don't do basic math basic math states that you don't take out $ 100.000.00 loan and come out collage and get job paying $ 32.000.00 the math dose not add up you supposed to learn to summarize your answers in high school student debt never be paid just do the math. Like wise you don't buy a $ 250.000.00 house for 30 years making $ 3.000.00 dollars a month 12 months in a year 3 X 12 is 36 just add your zero's $ 36. 000.00 these are the top two debts in America/ take a look at all the stores closing in the pass two years were are you going work?

  35. This video was more thorough than other videos on the subject. Some automatically blame the private sector. Others are quick to blame the government. The information presented here is much more thorough in general.

  36. I`m writing from Colombia. here, private universities are really expensive so the only option left for low income families is to apply for the public ones, that are still cheap (sometimes for free, if you belong to an ethnic group, faraway towns or settlements or your gfamily income is low) yet they have demanding admission exams that very lucky few pass. I explained that to our American English language assistant at the uiversity I work for, she asked me "how much did you pay back then" I made the conversion to American dollars plus inflation and it was worth around US$ 440 a year. She was shocked!!! she owed thousands of dollars. She couldn`t believe that even with such a low tuition, I struggled to pay tuition as back then I had no job. We in Colombia are fighting for our right for keeping and expanding publicly-funded education, if there's money for a large military in a small country (we have almost the same military personnel than that of Brazil) why not to fund public education to avoid the debt trap that's starting to grow down here??

  37. Basically, the US govt and 1% do not respect us citizens enough to actually keep society together and replace our numbers.

  38. Even if I got a Pell grant to complete community college without denial, I would still be unemployed during my semesters. No retail, no nothing even if I kept my grades and gpa up to get student work. USA was and is a joke when you cannot afford to live alone in a cheap apartment. Thankfully, I did not have debts to pay.

  39. This makes me mad because students of this generation can't afford college especially working in minimum wage jobs. We have to pray we find a job that pays a little bit more than minimum wage or work 3 jobs trying to afford a semester. I hate America

  40. The idiots in government and morons running colleges and universities still think this is a working system.
    Corporate America has gotten so greedy it is pretty much impossible for most people to pay this money back so they just do not even try LOL.

  41. You can come out of college with no-debt. And if really motivated – with money in the bank. Get real skills and refuse to take on debt. And stop studying useless subjects (subjects that you can study for free at your own time like a hobby).

  42. Why is this even a question? Why do students have student loans? Because they make dumb decisions and go to a nice private school for that “college experience” without majoring and anything worthwhile. It’s ok if you want to study liberal arts just don’t spend 200k to do so

  43. What a shame that the government has ruined the lives of so many young people with this debt for diploma scam. The legal age to drink alcohol is 21. It should be the same for debt. No one under the age of 21 should be allowed to borrow money for anything, including student loans. Young people need to learn to work and save up some cash so they'll know the value of a dollar and years from 18 – 21 is a good time for that. If more kids were forced to spend their own hard earned money from their own pocket, this student loan mess would stop.

  44. This is by far the best explanation I have viewed on the history of student loans in the USA. Well done!

  45. Elimination of current loans is unfair to some students. Some students paid almost their entire amount, whereas some others have not started paying. This policy discriminates against the students who repaid their loans to a large extent. A better policy would be an equal releif policy. Everyone gets the same relief amount, if you have already paid some of your loan, you can keep the money. If you have only started paying, your debt would be substantially lowered.

  46. I paid off $30,000 of student loan debt for my master's degree in 3 years. I worked full time while attending school part time and I lived frugally and within my means. It can be done, you don't need to go into debt for school.

  47. Why do they have so much debt? Because they took out huge loans and wasted the money on worthless pieces of paper.

  48. In Trinidad, tertiary education used to be totally free for about 10 years (and right before that it was 50% subsidized) and thankfully I was one of those who benefited. Now it's subsidized based on a means test.

  49. Stop going to school and start a business. It's not worth it. It's supply and demand. There is not enough demand compared with the supply or jobs. Start a business. Don't be a debt slave. Don't get a degree if you don't make a lot of money afterwords. Do your homework and don't be a slave to the banks and the government.

  50. But if you treat a student as a customer doesn't this mean you'd treat them with more leniency even if they underperform? In here I see a higher rate of student's dropping out during their first year, comparing to the time I was at the Uni. Mostly because they want to change their discipline (we don't have majors and minors, per se). You get two terms when you can pass the test and if you fail you have to pay for retaking the classes. But you're not allowed to retake after failing one of the main subjects in your first year.

  51. There's no such thing in Poland. We have studies on university – for free in day course, paid if you learn at the weekends. We have also a lot of private high schools, but You know how much You pay and You pay during Your studies.

  52. In short….
    It's the NEXUS created by GOVERNMENT, COLLEGES and Loan Providing Private Institutes which all join hands to create a VICIOUS CIRCLE of ever increasing TUITION FEES, pushing people to get MORE LOANS and return the nexus back at an astonishing HIGH INTEREST RATE.

  53. Im a senior in high school i want to go to college but im not going to 😂😂 I am not spending hundreds of thousands of dollars for a useless degree that gets me a job ! Wake up people if everyone stops going to college the prices should go down

  54. 2:22
    I see that old school b&w shot of The University of Texas, that tower has remained unchanged. Nice touch guys!

  55. WTF? If the tuition is more than $9K per year, that school is too damned expensive. You have no business attending a stupid school you can’t afford. College doesn’t have to be that expensive. In-state tuition for Cal State University is about $5,700 to $7,500 per year and about $1,100 per year at a community college. By living at home and working part-time, it’s possible to pay your way through school and not take out any student loans. Don’t be suckered into taking out student loans just because “everyone does it.” That’s stupid!

  56. Are there not guidance counselors that can guide your way or are you left on your own. If you are immersed in classes you may not see things others might see.

  57. my strategy is dont go to college, live with parents until you are 30 years old, buy a house, rent out your rooms on airbnb

  58. This video explained how government controlled financial aid caused huge fraud. Now, these same people want more government controlled financial aid. Why don't these people pay attention to history? Maybe these high priced colleges aren't teaching real history.

  59. Not everyone belongs or deserve to go to college. Some people aren't smart enough and shouldn't be encouraged to attend specialty if they'll be on the tax payers dime.

  60. R u guys smoking meth or what??? Community college does exist or a cheaper goddamn school wtf…stupid AF.

  61. Uh. ? Don’t sign the student loan ?
    Radical concept . . I didn’t graduate from high school, and I’m a millionaire, retired at 54 . .

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