Barricading a Classroom
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Barricading a Classroom


As we continue to learn more about the Active
Threat Plan we will practice and conduct drills on only one component of the ABC strategy
at a time. This training focuses only on Barricading. This short video breaks down the basics of
barricading in two basic classroom designs. However, there are many different classroom
and office designs in our schools. Each have their own unique design and security
challenges. That is why it is important that every teacher
gives thought NOW, how to best barricade their room should the need arise, and then practice
it often with students. Things to consider:
• Does the door have glass in it or beside it? • What type of handle does it have? • Does it have a hydraulic opening arm at
the top? • Does the door handle lock with a key and
do you have to go outside to lock it? • Regardless of the door style, the barricade
is useful for these purposes. The goal of a barricade is to deny, discourage,
or at least delay the attacker from getting inside where you are. You should be able to build an effective barricade
in less than two minutes (this takes only a little bit of practice). Practice NOW, and divide these tasks among
those in your class. 1. Make sure the classroom door is locked from
the OUTSIDE. 2. Cover the windows, and close the blinds
3. Turn off the lights
4. For traditional doorknobs that swing out,
you MAY, use a belt or rope to help keep the door closed. 5. Do not use your body as part of a barricade,
do not stand in front of the door and try to avoid windows. 6. Begin with the largest, bulkiest, and heaviest
object first. 7. **HINT** Plan ahead, by pre-staging furniture
that could be effective for barricading near the door. If not equipped with wheels, you might opt
to place “magic sliders” under the corners to make the furniture easier to move. 8. Remove the magic sliders, or lock the wheels
if applicable once in place. 9. Add additional furniture on top, and around
the barricade to make it stronger. Think about desks, chairs, cabinets, or any
large objects. 10. Spread out around the room, get low, and pick
up objects that can be thrown at the intruder as a distraction if they make it inside (countering). Here are some tips for barricading in rooms
with large floor to ceiling windows, double doors with windows, and push bars. 1. A belt will not work with the push bar exit. 2. Make sure the door is locked from the outside
when closed. 3. Begin with the largest, bulkiest, and heaviest
object first against the doors, be careful not to wedge the furniture against the release
bar. 4. Add additional furniture on top, and around
the barricade to make it stronger. 5. Use furniture at the lower half of the large
windows to create an additional obstacle and provide some shielding. A conference table, multi-person table, or
several smaller tables may do the trick. 6. Apply the same strategy for the doors that
have large windows in them. 7. Spread out around the room, get low, and pick
up objects that can be thrown at the intruder as a distraction if they make it inside (countering).

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