An American Chemistry Teacher – Periodic Table of Videos
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An American Chemistry Teacher – Periodic Table of Videos


‘I pledge allegiance to the flag of the
United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God,
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.’
[Music] My name is Robert Rountree and I teach seventh
grade science in Pittsburgh, New York which is upstate New York. And we focus on chemistry,
so I love to tell the kids that I love chemistry because I love the Periodic Table.
I remember my middle school teachers and I remember the demonstrations, so when I started
teaching I kind of used that as a guide that I would try to make sure that I would give
the kids as many demonstrations as possible. I think more times than not I use it as what’s
called a motivator, meaning you try to do something…the research says the kids will
remember whatever you say first and whatever you say last and if you’re lucky they will
remember something in-between. And that’s always the trick of putting a lesson together,
but if you can grab their attention at the beginning then you tend to have it for the
whole rest of the class. You know the idea of having a video for each element is brilliant,
it really is, because that way in one place you can go to and find out what it is you
want to know about that element and then each video obviously leads to more and more questions.
As soon as a kid mentions an element, or I mention an element, it will be like go to
the video. [Muted sound from video playing to the class]
Good Chemistry! Melt on! ‘The demo of the day is the demo of the
demo of the demo of the day!’ [Class cheers] You know when Brady said he was coming I thought
well what can I do, I was thinking, and I don’t know whether I had just seen the zinc
video or I went home and saw the zinc video, but I just thought that would be a really
cool demonstration. You know because there’s the ‘oh ah’ factor and then YouTube, is
it YouTube friendly? I decided in putting this together that I better find out whether
it was legal or not otherwise I was going to have to do something with dry ice, which
would have been awesome but not quite the ‘oh ah’ factor I was looking for. And
I called the USA mint and I got the person who sells coins, and she thought it was an
awesome question, and she said well let me give you some numbers and there is an educational
exemption that if you are melting pennies for educational purposes that that in fact
is okay, it is legal. Is white hot hotter than red hot?
Hi Professor my question is: is it aluminum or aluminium?
What’s your favourite element? What’s your least favourite element?
Hi, what’s the most dangerous element? What first got you interested in science?
So I just press space…or do I have to have the thing on the…? They’re interesting
questions aren’t they? Hey Professor, have you ever played with mercury?

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100 thoughts on “An American Chemistry Teacher – Periodic Table of Videos

  1. Hey Brady i live IN INDIA and EVEN WE USE PROFESSORS VIDEOS IN OUR SCHOOL I LOVE YOUR VIDEOS AND I WILLL SOON COME TO NOTTINGHAM TO STUDY CHEMISTRY !! YOUR BIGGEST FAN FROM INDIA – DHWANIT DAVE

  2. Hey Brady i LIVE IN INDIA AND I SHOW THESE VIDEOS TO MY SCHOOL CHILDREN THEY ARE A FAN OFF YOU AND ALL THE TEACHER ESPECIALLY PROFESSOR MARTIN AND WE ENJOY CHEMISTRY BECAUSE OF YOU THEREFORE I THANK YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF MY HEART TO MAKE EXELLENT VIDEOS OHH AND SURE I WILL COME TO STUDY CHEMISTRY IN NOTTINGHAM IN THE COMING YEARS SO PLEASE ASK THE PROFFFESOR TO COME TO INDIA THANKS

  3. Ethiopia, Sweden, China, the US–you really get around!

    Seeing your videos used in the classroom like this must be particularly gratifying. Keep up the good work!

  4. Depending, we did in my catholic school, might have in highschool. Not sure why it needs to be done every day but when I say it, I mean every word (being American).

    It would be even weirder if someone from another country said it ;p

  5. Religious freedom, yes, but it was founded by christians on Christian principles. You very vocal few keep trying to strip the rest of us of everything we hold dear. Please stop.

  6. Wonderful video! Thanks for visiting these students in America and do it again soon! Absolutely inspirational!

  7. I like how you point out that irreligious people are a minority. That obviously makes us less worthy of an opinion.

    What Christian principles? The laws are common sense, common morality, the same laws as you get in non-Christian countries. You have got our motives very wrong if you think we're trying to "strip you of what you hold dear". Stop stripping everyone else of their religious freedom by injecting Christianity into secular aspects of life.

  8. In primary school we had to sing the lords prayer every morning but I think that was the school's decision (there is no real choice of school here).

  9. Umm, on a less political note, I like what he says about demonstrations.

    I remember our chemistry teacher showing us how breaking up a substance would allow it to react faster by burning a pack of cards in a block and then separating them out.

  10. I think you guys are producing a brilliant series of videos and I commend Mr. Rountree for using them as a tool to get young minds excited about science.

    Great job…all of you.

  11. The whole "aluminum/aluminium" debate is pretty much the same as any other American spelling change debate. In any country other than the USA, I'd use "aluminium", but I'd probably just switch to calling it "aluminum" if I were over there (just as I'd call it "aluminio" in a Spanish-speaking country).

  12. When I first knew about the Periodic Table of Videos (PTV), I mentioned it on a forum. A friend read the forum and told a science teacher friend of his, and that teacher now uses the PTV in class.

    Brady Haran deserves a medal.

  13. The "True way" is the version accepted by IUPAC.
    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990, but three years later recognized aluminum as an acceptable variant. Hence their periodic table includes both.[old.iupac. org/reports/periodic_table/index.html]
    IUPAC officially prefers the use of aluminium in its internal publications, although several IUPAC publications use the spelling aluminum.

  14. If you remove the spaces that link will take you to an IUPAC Periodic Table.
    Both versions are acceptable, but the "ium" version is preferred. Hope that was useful.

  15. It isnt a prayer. It may sound like that though. Its the national anthem. I never said it in any class I was in throughout my schooling, but it appears some kids do.

  16. Although what i wrote is my personal feelings. i still love the vids. It also make me smile that there teachers like Mr Rountree they tend to be the exception.

  17. Awesome, I would have loved this in my class, I am no longer a student, I guess I never really was, but these videos make even me very enthusiast about chemistry and science in general.

    Greets from the Netherlands, iT

  18. hey professor did you every do an experiment at home that turned out to be really stinky and then your parents came home & you tried to keep a straigt face 🙂

  19. British profs may confuse-ify the kids. There are a few elements they pronounce differently, like Al (aluminum/aluminium). What are other elements with different British pronunciations?

  20. They never really touched the periodic table of elements until I was High School, except to say that it existed. Watching stuff like this really shows how slow my education was compared to others. Glad to see science actually being taught in schools though and not just rote memorization and regurgitation.

  21. Aluminium is spelt like that so I think you'll find we're right. I've never seen an American call people from England English before :D, it's always British.

  22. I teach Math, and I know not everyone needs to know the minutae of the mathematics of chemistry, I still adore it. and physics.

  23. I think a video focusing on nucleic phenomena would be fascinating. I love the part of "Cosmos" where Carl Sagan lays out the mathematical simplciity of protons & neutrons combining to form elements with distinct properties by virtue of the resulting unique stable electron clouds…

    Great video; great teacher; great kids; great questions! Wonderful work! Thanks very much!

  24. IF your willing to do the work to get the degree there are jobs that pay very well. Probably since there are so few people who can wrap their mind around everything that goes into science, just as a bit of warning I do know alot of unemployed or under employied engeneers.

  25. Wow they actually did quite a good job editing. this is great!

    lol im some kid at 1:03 at the left of the guy with the yellow shirt. check out my channel??

  26. "the demo of the day yay!"
    haha so cute!! I wish I had a teacher like that! Keep on motivating the kids to learn science, great work.

  27. Those public school kids are saying the pledge of allegiance wrong.
    Its: One nation, Indivisible…
    Not: One nation, under god…

    I'm not surprised this passes in American schools though… right wing extremist's have penetrated the school system.

  28. Good job Mr. Rountree! That's a great video! You have a future in YouTube videos! Start inviting more Scientists to class!

  29. @woodpod it the national anthem dude. . .often reqire or strongly "recommend" tat we recite it every morning at the start of class.

  30. @woodpod
    mostly just elementary schools do it, and some middle schools. you never see it in high schools or colleges. but ya, you are right

  31. I can't imagine a British teacher giving the legal issue any thought whatsoever, but would just do it. I mean it's only a penny…

  32. thats the pledge of allegiance.. and was done when i was in those grades, and glad to see they still do it some places…

  33. @woodpod I'd recommend trying to dig up some information on this before jumping to conclusions such as 'all Americans are cocky assholes'. Only a few states require children to say the pledge of allegiance during school, and it is usually disregarded as unnecessary by the aforementioned students. We aren't all as proud of our country as you'd seem to think.

  34. Under god… really? Science teachers should deplore such an anti-science 'faith-based' concept that has nothing to do with the world we live in. Please realize that 'faith' and science are mutually exclusive.

  35. What a lovely class and a nice teacher. I wish I had this type of education when I was as old as they were

  36. I love watching Martin's videos – he reminds me of my late Physics Teacher at boarding school who was very similar . Lots of demonstrations

  37. I never really understood the pledge of allegiance.

    I love Scotland, but I don't think I'd be able to fully take a teacher seriously if we were made to sing Flower of Scotland before the class.

  38. Yeeah alot of us dont really agree with the whole Pledge thing here… its definetely weird but something most people just accept it w/o thinking…

  39. It's within everyone's right to agree or disagree with the Pledge of Allegiance in the United States. But, do you really have to complain to everyone about it? We all have different views and opinions and it probably wouldn't make a bit of difference that you say you like or dislike it. Most of us came to watch a video about teaching chemistry (which I found wonderful to see so many girls interested in it), not to see complaints about a few seconds of a pledge unrelated to the video.

  40. I suspected as soon as the Pledge got into things the internet would have a cumulative heart attack. 
    Yup.

    But for real Mr Rountree, take a NAP, man. Good grief you look as if you're about to conk out right away

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