#20Questions with Egyptian Fulbrighter Michael Jacob for International Education Week
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#20Questions with Egyptian Fulbrighter Michael Jacob for International Education Week


Hey Michael, how’s it going? Hi! I’m good, how are you? Doing well, are you ready for your 20 questions? Uh, okay, that depends, but yeah keep it going? [laughs] Where are you from? I’m from Egypt. Where are we now? We’re at the George Washington University in D.C. What do you do for fun in Washington, D.C.? I go check out new restaurants, eat new food, go out with friends, shopping sometimes. How many times have you gone abroad? That’s my very first time here, in the States. Wow! What do you want to tell your friends back home about the United States? It’s a really cool place you guys, and I already miss you, so you should all come. If you could be any animal, what would you be, and why? I’m not really inclined to be an animal, but I would definitely be my cat, because she sits all day, does nothing, worries about nothing, I mean who doesn’t like that? Are you here through a specific program? Yeah, I’m on a Fulbright, it’s a student exchange program that gets people from all over the world to America and vice-versa on study abroad programs. Tell us about something crazy that has happened here so far. Well I came late at night, and I’m very bad with cooking, so [laughs] and I had promised my roommates that I’m going to cook for them the next day. So I started grating the onion, because that’s what we do in Egypt, and then I didn’t realize that I was actually grating my hand… So here it is. I bled to death. [laughs] Oh no! [laughs] What advice do you have for someone who is learning english? I would say what helped me was watching a lot of movies, and a lot of tv shows, and songs, it gave me the accent at least. How many roommates do you have? I have three. What are you studying? I’m studying international education. If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be? So I like acting, and singing, and I study international ed., so I would have dinner with Anne Hathaway, Beyoncé, and someone from the U.S. Education Department. What does international education mean to you? Well, to me, the word that actually describes it is “inclusive,” because it includes everyone, it tackles a lot of issues about inequality in education all over the world. But professionally it will qualify me to maybe teach abroad, work at international student offices, or work on the development of education in developing countries like Egypt. How is the United States similar to Egypt? It’s really not, but I mean that’s the thing, I mean, it wouldn’t be worth it if you go to a country that is similar to yours. So, it’s a good experience, and a new one. What do you think of the food here? It’s good. I like it, pretty much, but I still miss my mom’s cooking. Do you have any hidden talents? Uh, I guess I could sing? Oh, can I hear? Oh, okay… [laughs] [clears throat] [singing] Round, like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel, [singing] Round, like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel,
[singing] never ending or beginning, on an ever-spinning reel, [singing] never ending or beginning, on an ever-spinning reel, [singing in Arabic] Well, nevermind, I forgot it. Let’s keep going. [laughs] Well, nevermind, I forgot it. Let’s keep going. [laughs]
What’s your favorite class? What’s your favorite class? Comparative and International Ed. What’s your hardest class? Same one, Comparative and International Education. Has anything surprised you about U.S. culture? Well, my answer’s going to be a little different from most international students. I have been introduced to the culture way before I came here, because I used to watch a lot of tv shows. I used to watch ‘Grey’s Anatomy,’ ‘How to Get Away with Murder,’ ‘Friends.’ So, this all gave me like a hint, insights about the American culture way before I was here. So I wasn’t really surprised, but I’m living the experience. One last question- What advice would you give to someone who wants to study abroad in the United States? Well, in Egypt we really care about transcripts, but that’s not really what defines you. So, it’s important, but it’s not the most important thing. I mean, if you get a call for an interview, this means they want to see something that is not on your application, which is you. Your personality. So, a lot of people can have your grades, but no one can have you. So, a lot of people can have your grades, but no one can have you.
So make sure to be yourself, make sure to be your own, So make sure to be yourself, make sure to be your own, I mean comfortable in your own skin. I guess that’s all I can say. And I really have to run now. I’m sorry, I have a class. Thanks Michael! Have a great class. Alright, bye!

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